OffshoringManagement.com >> Links

Here are some links and select articles on Offshoring and Outsourcing that may be of interest:

Understanding the Offshoring Challenge -  The number of service sector jobs that have gone overseas is actually relatively small. But the fears engendered by offshoring have a valid basis. Since January 2001, the U.S. economy has lost almost 2 million jobs. Even now, with the economy (GDP) growing at over 3 percent a year, job creation has been surprisingly weak this far past the recession.

An introduction to offshoring- Offshoring of white-collar work remains relatively modest when measured in aggregate employment flows. In some key industries, however, (software, for example) this employment impact is likely quite significant. Furthermore, the overall economic impact of offshoring is potentially enormous.

IBM's Insider in Outsourcing  -Big Blue's head of outsourcing for Asia-Pacific says it's no longer just about saving money, it's about adding talent, too.

What to Move Offshore? Selecting IT Activities for Offshore Locations - Going offshore has become less a strategic advantage and more a competitive necessity. Pioneering firms are adopting more aggressive plans and the followers are struggling to keep up.

'Women are IT' Debate and Discussion : Australia v's Offshore – how can Australia win?- I’m pleased to get a chance to speak to the issue of ICT Offshoring. It’s obviously an important topic, and it’s not going away, but it has achieved special relevance with Telstra announcing a new $75 million deal with Infosys just last month.
This deal could see up to 180 Australian jobs lost as Infosys moves this work overseas. Australia has a choice: if we are complacent, or if we resign ourselves to this phenomenon, it will be just the beginning. I don't accept it is inevitable that somehow Australia must be relegated to being minor, limited contributor to a global production process for IT products and services. The truth is, we can’t simply give up, we must take steps to combat this trend.

Survey on China's Software Employees - China's software employees have been suffering from rigid education at universities and lack of training at enterprises, a survey on the existence of software workers by a committee of China Youth Software Promotion Project (CYSPP) found recently.

Software engineering in China: The next big thing - China is gearing up to become a serious contender for American and European software development outsourcing contracts. This column reports on what the Chinese government -- and the country's universities and businesses -- are doing to train professionals and upgrade domestic software development practices.

Nice Work If You Can Get It - It's hard to listen to a politician or pundit these days without hearing that America is "losing jobs" to poorer nations -- manufacturing jobs to China, back-office work to India, just about every job to Latin America. This lament distracts our attention from the larger challenge of preparing more Americans for better jobs.

Country Analysis: Mexico
The Mexican Information Technology (IT) outsource software services sector is a USD $30 million1 industry. Although the industry is quite small compared to behemoths such as India and Russia, Mexico has unique advantages which it can exploit to vault it into serious consideration for offshore software outsourcing.

BearingPoint opens second development facility in China-
BearingPoint Inc. is opening its second offshore development facility in China, a move analysts see as part of a trend by U.S. firms to expand offshore development operations in that country.

The India jobs timebomb
Outsourcing `middle-class jobs' to India is set to become a a real threat to the Irish economy, according to trade unions, policymakers and analysts. The warning was sounded last weekby David Begg,the general secretary of the Irish Congress Of Trade Unions. Begg told the Tanaiste's Enterprise Strategy Group that outsourcing high-skilled jobs in financial services, IT and engineering to countries such as India was now ``a considerable worry''.